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Blog Category: Blogging (3 posts)


| 24th October 2018 | Gaming
With Halloween around the corner, my son is asking me for “spooky” games we can play. Seeing as Resident Evil might be a bit soon for a five-year-old, the gem that is Luigi’s Mansion makes a return to my life once more. Not in the recent release of the 3DS version, but by digging out my dusty Gamecube copy. The game was one of the choices you got when buying a Gamecube bundle during the console’s release. Console release games don’t tend to stay with me very long (Smash Bros Melee was my ultimate motivation for acquiring a Gamecube, but you learn to be grateful as a twelve-year-old) but 16 years later, I’m truly appreciating this game for what it is. The game’s premise opens up to Luigi locating a Mansion he’s won in a recent competition- But to his dismay, he finds the entire building to be haunted by ghosts. Classic. Luckily, your new neighbour Professor E.Gadd fills you in on the mansions’ situation and is even kind enough to give you the Poltergeist 3000- a vacuum that hoovers up ghosts that you can then restore into paintings, of course. Then, like the kindly neighbour he is, trains you on how to use it via a quick tutorial in a convenient training simulation in his lab, then sends off a very reluctant Luigi to fend for himself in his newly acquired mansion. If you take a step back from Luigi's Mansion you’ll notice it’s actually a very simple game- locate and vacuum up all the ghosts in the room until the room’s candles light up with a satisfying sound of positive gamification, followed by moving on to the next room. As well as enjoying its calming simplicity in a time when hectic Battle Royale games are peaking, it’s also the classic Nintendo charm that keeps me coming back. Hitting A when near an object will make Luigi give it a whack or shake, usually for drawing out Boo’s or for money- that you cruelly are never able to spend until the very end of the game when your house essentially gets valued. But whilst aimlessly walking...

TGD | 23rd March 2018 | Gaming
  Like a lot of people, I suffer from heavy bouts of stress and anxiety. Whilst some of it I have to take as it comes, there's also a fair bit I can take responsibility for and do something about: Drink less coffee, sleep more and play less stress-induced-haemorrhage causing things like Halo 2 on Legendary. The first two are invalid options because they are apart of being a parent. So after finishing the Halo 2 Campaign, I was very grateful to stumble across this gem that I somehow missed. AER is a game by Forgotten Key, A studio in Sweden that specialises in atmospheric experiences. Kotaku described AER as Wind Waker but flying instead of sailing, and they're not wrong. You play as Auk, a young girl set out on a pilgrimage to restore the broken world after it's great divide. Gods are slowly being forgotten and therefore losing their power. Auk must journey to the Land of the Gods and stop the darkness that threatens this beautiful, fragmented world. As one of the last shapeshifters, performing a simple double jump sends Auk soring into the air as a bird, where you can visit the temples to retrieve the lost shards, or simply cruise around the open world at your leisure. The controls are super-intuitive as theirs a simplicity to what you can do: Fly, interact, move and jump. The only slight difficulty is I got a bit too carried away with 'flapping' to pick up speed during flight. You don't realise how fast you're going until you're a few meters away from an island and can end up shooting straight past it without having time to think about landing. The game has soft glowing colours in low-poly/cell-shaded style graphics, accompanied by the beautiful ambient music and sounds of Cajsa Larsson. It's the cheapest form of therapy I've come across so far.   Describing this game as a type of Legend of Zelda but without the fighting would be an awful sell, but here for me lies the beauty of AER for what I need to relax. The puzzles in the temples are not so easy t...

| 26th February 2018 | Gaming
Or writing about one of your favourite games to avoid the horrifying realisation that it's ending soon With the 2nd episode of Before the Storm that came out this month, you may be familiar or at least have heard of Life is Strange. For the not-so-familiar, LiS is a non-linear choice based game from the minds of DONTNOD (Remember me). Despite being a story focused indie game, it did amazingly well. Won a bunch of awards for it a few years back and the fan base is obsessive and loyal. Things got busier at DONTNOD since the game's success, so they handed the production of the prequel over to DECK NINE. I recently finished the 2nd episode of the prequel: Before the Storm and I am not in the slightest bit disappointed like the internet seemed compelled on telling me I would be. DECK NINE are doing an amazing job of making an amazing game- even without the time travel. And as for all the moaning about the change in Chloe’s voice actor… I honestly don’t think I would have noticed if someone hadn’t told me prior. It made sense anyway, as the Chloe in BTS is younger. Regardless, both voice actors are amazing. The Life is Strange games are not for everyone. This game can be played in a pretty laid back manner, so if you prefer playing games where it feels like there’s a hand curling its fingers around your heart ready to rip it out when you run out of HP (Hi Dark Souls) then this game might not be for you. But for someone who doesn’t get much gaming time these days outside of work and parenting (you can’t “just pause” A Halo 3 campaign on Legendary, crying baby or no), this game was perfect. what it lacks in button mashing action, makes up for in a brilliant story, relatable characters and multiple outcomes from the choices you make with heavy impact. I was a little late to the game with Life is Strange, so thankfully all the episodes were already out and night by night me and my wife devoured them. We also got to watch and judge each other on the d...